Many electricity customers could soon receive unpleasant mail: the energy giant Eon does not want to extend numerous existing contracts, as reported by “Wirtschaftswoche”.

The magazine quotes a letter from the energy supplier in the report: “All providers are currently confronted with a historically unique situation on the energy markets.” The tariffs are therefore being continuously revised, which is why the supplier “unfortunately has to end contracts at the end of the term in individual cases”.

Eon would give customers a choice: either switch to a significantly more expensive tariff, go to basic service or switch providers. Many electricity consumers could be asked to pay much more – in times of high inflation and skyrocketing gas prices.

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The procedure of the energy giant is completely legal: it makes a difference whether contracts are not extended at the end of the term or whether consumers are thrown out of the contracts in the middle of the contractual relationship. The latter has happened since the energy crisis, especially with electricity discount providers.

Nevertheless, the procedure of not extending contracts is a novelty on the market for such a large utility as Eon. The German energy group supplies 14 million customers in Germany with electricity and gas.

Eon had “previously not terminated any contracts with customers prematurely”, price increases were “moderate” compared to other providers, consumer protection activist Matthias Moeschler tells the magazine. “Many people have no financial reserves to be able to bear these additional costs.” The “dramatically” increased energy prices would now also reach the large suppliers and be passed on to existing customers.

At the request of the “Wirtschaftswoche”, Eon did not want to comment on how many customers are affected by the procedure or how many terminations there are currently. The company speaks of “a few cases” in which “we do not renew contracts that no longer correspond to the current market conditions because we can no longer offer the relevant tariffs in the form, for example”.

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The original for this article “Energy giant Eon kicks out first electricity customers” comes from chip.de.